A report on the sports taboo by malcom gladwell

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A report on the sports taboo by malcom gladwell

Throughout the chapter, Gladwell describes certain advantages sports players and children in school have simply because of their birth dates.

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They happened to be born in an advantageous part of the year, and that time of birth led them to have certain advantages that spiraled upwards from that point on. Gladwell explains a rather unique statistic: The explanation for this unusual statistic is simple: So, if you turn ten on January 1, you are going to be a lot bigger, physically more mature, and more coordinated than a child who turns ten on December 31st.

After noting this statistic, Gladwell then goes on to describe the spiral effect from that point on—the bigger kids will play better and then be scouted by better coaches for more competitive teams. On those competitive teams, the bigger kids will be given better coaches, more chances to play and practice, and games against other more competitive teams.

From there, they are scouted into more elite teams, and it just gets better. From merely being born in the first part of the year, some children have an innate advantage that often has nothing to do with personal ability or work ethic. They are simply bigger and more coordinated because they are older; because of that, they are given advantages on better teams from the beginning, increasing their chances to improve their skills.

A report on the sports taboo by malcom gladwell

Gladwell compares this to many other facets of society. He mentions that a similar phenomenon occurs in European soccer and also in test scores in school systems. For the test scores, the older kids in the grade score higher than do the younger children.

This is a statistic that is true from elementary school all the way up through college. Based on all of these findings, Gladwell asserts that the way we look at success has often been defined by glorifying personal achievement, hard work, and innate talent; however, with findings like this, we need to take into account that sometimes people are more successful than others their age simply because they were born at an advantageous time.The story I choose was the Sports Taboo by Malcom Gladwell.

The word sports in the title caught my eye while I was flipping through the pages. I found the story very interesting and controversial.

The essay begins with the subject why blacks are better than whites in sports. An example he gives is the track field.3/5(3). The story I choose was the Sports Taboo by Malcom Gladwell.

The word sports in the title caught my eye while I was flipping through the pages. I found the story very interesting and controversial.

The essay begins with the subject why blacks are better than whites in sports. An example he gives is 3/5(3).

Academic fight! Malcolm Gladwell's popular "10,hours rule" was debunked in a Sports Illustrated writer's new book, so Gladwell defended his piece by accusing the author of creating a "straw. Title • What is Malcolm Gladwell’s argument, in The Sports Taboo, that “blacks like boys and whites like girls” Author: User Last modified by.

Example: "In the after math of the game, the players and their families and sports reporters from across the country crammed into the winning team's locker room) (Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers, pg 16) Explanation: The imagery created by imagining the people being crammed.

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